Addicted To Plastic

ADDICTED TO PLASTIC SHOWING JANUARY  10

WHEN: Wed, Jan 10, 7:00-8:30 pm

WHERE: Peacock Hall

DESCRIPTION:  Plastic is everywhere — for better and worse: floating ocean swirls as big as Texas, artificial organs, water bottles, and wind turbines. This film explores the history of plastic and how it came to dominate our lives. From styrofoam cups to automobiles, plastics are perhaps the most ubiquitous and versatile material ever invented. No invention in the past 100 years has had more influence and presence. But this progress has come at a cost.

No ecosystem or segment of human activity has escaped the grasp of plastic. ADDICTED TO PLASTIC is a global journey to investigate an industry worth $375 billion/year in the US alone. Review what we really know about the material of a thousand uses and why there’s so much of it. On the way we discover a toxic legacy and about some of its effects on our health.

We also meet some men and women dedicated to cleaning it up — groups dedicated to physically cleaning up the beaches and the oceans. We learn from experts about cutting edge solutions in recycling plastic and what actually happens when newer plastics biodegrade. These solutions will provide viewers with a new perspective about our future with plastic. It’s also an opportunity to examine our role in a throwaway culture.

85 minutes long. Captions available.

Trailer: http://youtu.be/daSFXZT-HYk

In recent years there has been considerable industry pushback against research demonstrating the adverse health effects of plastics.

https://chriskresser.com/re-examining-the-evidence-on-bpa-and-plastics/

Tips for reducing your exposure to the toxins in plastic

  • Use glass cups for drinking.
  • Instead of plastic water bottles, use stainless steel or glass.
  • Use glass containers for food storage.
  • Never heat food in plastic containers.
  • Use parchment paper or beeswax fabric instead of plastic wrap.
  • Avoid canned foods, as the linings typically contain BPA or a BPA alternative.
  • Read labels on cosmetics and personal care products, and avoid those that contain phthalates in the ingredients list.
  • Skip the receipt, as most have a BPA or equivalent coating.
  • Choose wood or fabric toys for children instead of plastic.
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